La Complainte Du Paresseux: Histoire Principalement Tragique D'andrew Whittaker, Réunissant L'ensemble Irrémédiablement Définitif De Ses Oeuvres Complètes: Roman download pdf

La Complainte Du Paresseux: Histoire Principalement Tragique D'andrew Whittaker, Réunissant L'ensemble Irrémédiablement Définitif De Ses Oeuvres Complètes: Roman

La Complainte Du Paresseux: Histoire Principalement Tragique D'andrew Whittaker, Réunissant L'ensemble Irrémédiablement Définitif De Ses Oeuvres Complètes:  Roman
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Pages: 254
ISBN: 2742796398
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There are two types of people who will really enjoy Sam Savage's "Cry of The Sloth". The first - those with literary aspirations struggling to balance 'real life' and writing - is a given, as it mirrors the plight of the novel's hero. The second type is the type that enjoys wanting to laugh and sob helplessly at the same time.

The novel is a "collection" of the "writings" of Andrew Whittaker, a sad, lonely man hung up on events of the past. We observe his one-sided conversations in letters to his ex-wife, who has moved away to become an actress; to other writers who have submitted pieces to his failing literary journal, now the laughing stock of the arts community in his area; letters he has written to that arts community under anagramic psuedonyms trumpeting his own talents and worth; to the unruly tenants of his crumbling real estate properties; to the phone company or the bank to appeal for some ease of financial burden. We are provided snippets of his prose poems, of his farcical novel, of his grocery lists. If the concept is gimmicky, it is no less entertaining. Whittaker as a character is hilariously snarky and deeply depressed, and that we are able to see this in every seemingly mundane bit of pen placed to paper is a feat of Savage's brilliant characterization.

The title of the novel comes from Whittaker's observation that, like the sloth, he has become "quite mossy" among other endearing parallels he's able to draw after reading about the sloth in a collection of encyclopedias detailing the lives of mammals. But Whittaker is battling something entirely human - to live a fulfilling creative life and be recognized for having done so, amid mounting chaos and ruin. As readers, we want Andrew to come through it, even as we relish his awkward attempts to do so and the misanthropic commentary that accompanies this.

My only complaint is that after pages and pages of a downward spiral, the novel ends abruptly with him giving up some of his creative aspirations. But we never find out what happens with his day-to-day plight. And it's hard to believe that even in his disappointment at having to set his dreams aside, he also stopped corresponding with everyone in his life. I think it must have been a challenge for Sam Savage to develop a plot entirely through letters, so I recognize that this "collected writing" is really a snippet of a writer going through a difficult period and then, somehow, moving on. But we don't get to see the full transformation, even after falling for such an engrossing character. Still, that the reader can be so absorbed in this character's life speaks highly to the novel's merits, however brief the book.

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